Global Statistics

All countries
99,205,108
Confirmed
Updated on January 23, 2021 9:39 pm
All countries
71,018,763
Recovered
Updated on January 23, 2021 9:39 pm
All countries
2,126,685
Deaths
Updated on January 23, 2021 9:39 pm

Global Statistics

All countries
99,205,108
Confirmed
Updated on January 23, 2021 9:39 pm
All countries
71,018,763
Recovered
Updated on January 23, 2021 9:39 pm
All countries
2,126,685
Deaths
Updated on January 23, 2021 9:39 pm

Rhode Island Pushes Aggressive Testing, a Move That Could Ease Reopening

Grand Jury Deliberations in Breonna Taylor Case Will Be Released

U.S.|Grand Juror in Breonna Taylor Case Says Deliberations Were MisrepresentedThe Kentucky attorney general’s office said it would release the panel’s recordings after a grand juror contended in a court filing that its discussions were inaccurately characterized.Breonna Taylor's family and the lawyer Ben Crump, right, said the charges a Kentucky grand jury agreed upon in the…

Video shows alleged ballot harvesting in Ilhan Omar’s district

Fox News Back to Top ©2020 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. All market data delayed 20 minutes. New Privacy Policy - New Terms of Use (What's New) - FAQ

A Once-in-a-Century Climate ‘Anomaly’ Might Have Made World War I Even Deadlier

(John Finney Photography/Moment/Getty Images) An abnormally bad season of weather may have had a significant impact on the death toll from both World War I and the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, according to new research, with many more lives being lost due to torrential rain and plummeting temperatures. Through a detailed analysis of an ice…

Sean Hannity claims Dems ‘put all their eggs in the debate basket’ ahead of first Biden-Trump showdown

Joe Biden's campaign has "put all their eggs in the debate basket" after the Democratic nominee kept a low profile for much of the summer, Sean Hannity claimed Monday.“I believe his campaign team – they are seeing what we all see,” said the “Hannity” host, who noted that the former vice president's campaign wrapped up its public events…

Tucker: Amy Coney Barrett ‘represents everything that made this a great country,’ so Dems ‘despise her’

Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett is causing an uproar among Democrats and according to Tucker Carlson, her happy family is what’s driving them crazy.“Democrats know Amy Coney Barrett’s life refutes the lies they have pushed on the rest of us for decades, [so] they must destroy her personally,” the “Tucker Carlson Tonight” host said…

The state has seen a rise in cases of the coronavirus, in part, experts say, because it is testing more than many states.

Credit…David Goldman/Associated Press

Michael Powell

Rhode Island gives the appearance of a state where the coronavirus is a fire raging, the average number of daily infections more than quadrupling since the start of this month.

The reality is more complicated and encouraging, as state health workers have tested more residents per capita in Rhode Island than in any other state, leading them to discover many infections that might have gone overlooked elsewhere.

250

tests per 100,000 residents

Minimum level recommended by experts

200

150

Free rapid

testing begins in Rhode Island

100

50

Mar. 8

Mar. 15

Mar. 22

Mar. 29

Apr. 5

Apr. 12

Apr. 19

Apr. 26

250

tests per 100,000 residents

200

Minimum level recommended by experts

150

100

Free rapid

testing begins in Rhode Island

50

Mar. 15

Mar. 29

Apr. 12

Apr. 26

Extensive testing is seen as an essential tool, experts say, as states contemplate restarting public life, and search for ways to keep a handle on the virus’s path and signs of new outbreaks in the days and weeks that follow. Five percent of Rhode Island’s residents have undergone a test, compared with about 1 percent of people in states like Texas and Georgia, where reopening efforts are taking shape.

“Rhode Island is shining a light into the dark in a way that very few other states are doing,” said Mark Lurie, a professor of epidemiology at Brown University in Providence. Rhode Island has been conducting an average of 283 tests per 100,000 residents a day, compared with 79 tests per 100,000 people in the United States overall.

To be sure, Rhode Island’s relatively small population — just over a million people — makes it easier to carry out testing on a high percentage of residents, but the state’s focus has grown intense.

“All I hear is testing, testing, testing,” said Dr. Ashish Jha, who is director of Harvard’s Global Health Institute and is helping Rhode Island’s government. “The bottom line is that there is no magic formula and the federal government is too often absent. But there are common lessons from states that have done a good job.”

On Monday, Gov. Gina Raimondo said that she intends in two weeks to begin the painstaking process of reopening Rhode Island’s economy, depending on how the situation looks in the coming days. “It’s not going to be a flick of the switch,” she said, cautioning that an uptick in hospitalizations could force her to delay. “It’s going to be slow, pinpointed, gradual.”

And all decisions going forward, Ms. Raimondo said, will rest on a foundation of testing and more testing, and tracing infections.

For the moment Rhode Island, the nation’s smallest state, walks an uncertain path. The mayors of its densely packed and polyglot cities speak of rising rates of infection. Last week, health officials announced that workers at a Taylor Farms New England, which packs salads and produce for supermarkets in North Kingstown, had tested positive for the virus. By Sunday, 133 cases had been reported in connection with the facility.

Statewide, hospitalizations appear to have peaked a week ago at 277, and have dropped slightly.

Deaths from the virus reached a daily peak of 19 in Rhode Island earlier this month, according to a New York Times tally, and fell to as low as five on one day last week. By Monday, 7,708 people in Rhode Island were reported to have tested positive for the virus and 233 people had died.

In its accomplishments and struggles, Rhode Island represents much that is confounding about confronting this virus. Like most of the governors in the Northeast, Ms. Raimondo was reluctant to issue a shelter-in-place order in mid-March, hoping that social distancing and the careful tracking of routes of infection might forestall a crushing shutdown of the economy.

She soon reversed herself, closing parks and tartly advising people crowding beaches and backyards to “knock it off.” On March 28, she ordered all but essential businesses and employees to shelter in place, saying: “This is going to get very real very fast for all of us.”

A week later, Gov. Raimondo and Nicole Alexander-Scott, her health commissioner, made a concerted effort to ramp up testing after Rhode Island had trailed some other New England states on that front. State officials across the nation have struggled to acquire and administer large numbers of tests, two steps considered essential in stopping the spread of the virus and reopening economies. Rhode Island officials said they were uncertain about what the testing regimen would cost, as they are pulling it together quickly from private-sector donations, including CVS Pharmacy, and federal stimulus dollars.

In recent weeks, Ms. Raimondo, who has a background as a data-driven venture capitalist, has regularly urged residents to keep a journal of all people they encounter each day, against the possibility that they might test positive and health workers will need to track down their contacts. Amid the crisis, Ms. Raimondo’s approval rating has risen to 80 percent, in one survey, from scraping by last fall with 36 percent.

“She’s a no-baloney technocrat,” said Ross Cheit, a professor in Brown University’s public policy program. “She’s not charming but she’s really smart, and that’s made her really popular now.”

Of late, state and local officials have turned their focus on testing to Pawtucket and Central Falls — dense, working-class cities nestled along the Seekonk River. These cities have multigenerational immigrant families, from Central America, Cape Verde and a dozen African nations, and many live tightly packed.

In Pawtucket, a city of 70,000 people, 570 residents have tested positive so far, second only to Providence, the state’s largest city.

“We have police going old-school, cruising around with their microphones going, telling them to distance, to wash hands and that free testing is available,” Pawtucket Mayor Donald R. Grebien said.

The two cities now have platoons of workers trying to contact all residents, and in their native languages. The object is to persuade those who are symptomatic to get tested. To this end, they have placed a testing site in the middle of each of these cities, an approach that is critical because nearly one-fifth of residents do not have cars. Testing is free with a referral, and anyone who needs a lift to the site can get one. Providence, too, started a new walk-up testing center last week.

Once a resident has tested positive, officials begin the painstaking task of trying to trace whom they came in contact with. “It’s been a herculean effort,” Gov. Raimondo said in a briefing. “It’s very labor intensive.”

Rhode Island is one of the few states to attempt such widespread testing and tracing. New York City until recently confined most of its testing to those who showed up at hospitals, the sickest of the sick. Perhaps as a result, Rhode Island’s test results show infections near evenly distributed by age, without a tilt toward the oldest and sickest that is seen in most cities.

Ahead for the state is figuring out how to merge its elaborate testing program with a plan to reopen.

Ms. Raimondo and other officials have taken pains to make clear that the first months back will not resemble anything like pre-virus life. Retail stores could open for pickup of pre-ordered items; restaurants with outdoor seating might soon be allowed to experiment. Each decision will entail a speculative, precarious calculus as the state tries to avoid new outbreaks. “We’re about to enter a whole new era of work,” she said.

To some extent, the many unionized city employees who have worked through the shutdown, in offices and on bridges and roads, have pioneered this new way of work life: They wear masks and gloves and have their temperature taken every day. Working hours are staggered, and meals are solitary affairs.

“We police it pretty tight,” said Michael Sabitoni, president of the Rhode Island Building & Construction Trades Council, which represents 16 unions. “This is not the old life.”

In the weeks ahead, other states may look to Rhode Island for signs of how extensive testing can affect reopenings and whether it helps slow new outbreaks. Systematic testing, Dr. Lurie said, should allow officials to monitor the virus’s path in the weeks ahead — to see who is sick, and to react quickly to close a factory, a school or an office building if a new outbreak emerges.

“If you open too quickly and get a surge of infections, you lose the trust of the public who you’ve locked away for a month,” he said. “Staying closed a little longer is epidemically a wiser decision. Rhode Island has a chance to get it right.”

Keith Collins and Alex Schwartz contributed reporting.

  • Updated April 11, 2020

    • When will this end?

      This is a difficult question, because a lot depends on how well the virus is contained. A better question might be: “How will we know when to reopen the country?” In an American Enterprise Institute report, Scott Gottlieb, Caitlin Rivers, Mark B. McClellan, Lauren Silvis and Crystal Watson staked out four goal posts for recovery: Hospitals in the state must be able to safely treat all patients requiring hospitalization, without resorting to crisis standards of care; the state needs to be able to at least test everyone who has symptoms; the state is able to conduct monitoring of confirmed cases and contacts; and there must be a sustained reduction in cases for at least 14 days.

    • What should I do if I feel sick?

      If you’ve been exposed to the coronavirus or think you have, and have a fever or symptoms like a cough or difficulty breathing, call a doctor. They should give you advice on whether you should be tested, how to get tested, and how to seek medical treatment without potentially infecting or exposing others.

    • Should I wear a mask?

      The C.D.C. has recommended that all Americans wear cloth masks if they go out in public. This is a shift in federal guidance reflecting new concerns that the coronavirus is being spread by infected people who have no symptoms. Until now, the C.D.C., like the W.H.O., has advised that ordinary people don’t need to wear masks unless they are sick and coughing. Part of the reason was to preserve medical-grade masks for health care workers who desperately need them at a time when they are in continuously short supply. Masks don’t replace hand washing and social distancing.

    • How does coronavirus spread?

      It seems to spread very easily from person to person, especially in homes, hospitals and other confined spaces. The pathogen can be carried on tiny respiratory droplets that fall as they are coughed or sneezed out. It may also be transmitted when we touch a contaminated surface and then touch our face.

    • Is there a vaccine yet?

      No. Clinical trials are underway in the United States, China and Europe. But American officials and pharmaceutical executives have said that a vaccine remains at least 12 to 18 months away.

    • What makes this outbreak so different?

      Unlike the flu, there is no known treatment or vaccine, and little is known about this particular virus so far. It seems to be more lethal than the flu, but the numbers are still uncertain. And it hits the elderly and those with underlying conditions — not just those with respiratory diseases — particularly hard.

    • What if somebody in my family gets sick?

      If the family member doesn’t need hospitalization and can be cared for at home, you should help him or her with basic needs and monitor the symptoms, while also keeping as much distance as possible, according to guidelines issued by the C.D.C. If there’s space, the sick family member should stay in a separate room and use a separate bathroom. If masks are available, both the sick person and the caregiver should wear them when the caregiver enters the room. Make sure not to share any dishes or other household items and to regularly clean surfaces like counters, doorknobs, toilets and tables. Don’t forget to wash your hands frequently.

    • Should I stock up on groceries?

      Plan two weeks of meals if possible. But people should not hoard food or supplies. Despite the empty shelves, the supply chain remains strong. And remember to wipe the handle of the grocery cart with a disinfecting wipe and wash your hands as soon as you get home.

    • Should I pull my money from the markets?

      That’s not a good idea. Even if you’re retired, having a balanced portfolio of stocks and bonds so that your money keeps up with inflation, or even grows, makes sense. But retirees may want to think about having enough cash set aside for a year’s worth of living expenses and big payments needed over the next five years.


Read More

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Hot Topics

Grand Jury Deliberations in Breonna Taylor Case Will Be Released

U.S.|Grand Juror in Breonna Taylor Case Says Deliberations Were MisrepresentedThe Kentucky attorney general’s office said it would release the panel’s recordings after a grand juror contended in a court filing that its discussions were inaccurately characterized.Breonna Taylor's family and the lawyer Ben Crump, right, said the charges a Kentucky grand jury agreed upon in the…

Video shows alleged ballot harvesting in Ilhan Omar’s district

Fox News Back to Top ©2020 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. All market data delayed 20 minutes. New Privacy Policy - New Terms of Use (What's New) - FAQ

A Once-in-a-Century Climate ‘Anomaly’ Might Have Made World War I Even Deadlier

(John Finney Photography/Moment/Getty Images) An abnormally bad season of weather may have had a significant impact on the death toll from both World War I and the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, according to new research, with many more lives being lost due to torrential rain and plummeting temperatures. Through a detailed analysis of an ice…

Sean Hannity claims Dems ‘put all their eggs in the debate basket’ ahead of first Biden-Trump showdown

Joe Biden's campaign has "put all their eggs in the debate basket" after the Democratic nominee kept a low profile for much of the summer, Sean Hannity claimed Monday.“I believe his campaign team – they are seeing what we all see,” said the “Hannity” host, who noted that the former vice president's campaign wrapped up its public events…

Tucker: Amy Coney Barrett ‘represents everything that made this a great country,’ so Dems ‘despise her’

Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett is causing an uproar among Democrats and according to Tucker Carlson, her happy family is what’s driving them crazy.“Democrats know Amy Coney Barrett’s life refutes the lies they have pushed on the rest of us for decades, [so] they must destroy her personally,” the “Tucker Carlson Tonight” host said…

Related Articles

Grand Jury Deliberations in Breonna Taylor Case Will Be Released

U.S.|Grand Juror in Breonna Taylor Case Says Deliberations Were MisrepresentedThe Kentucky attorney general’s office said it would release the panel’s recordings after a grand juror contended in a court filing that its discussions were inaccurately characterized.Breonna Taylor's family and the lawyer Ben Crump, right, said the charges a Kentucky grand jury agreed upon in the…

Video shows alleged ballot harvesting in Ilhan Omar’s district

Fox News Back to Top ©2020 FOX News Network, LLC. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. All market data delayed 20 minutes. New Privacy Policy - New Terms of Use (What's New) - FAQ

A Once-in-a-Century Climate ‘Anomaly’ Might Have Made World War I Even Deadlier

(John Finney Photography/Moment/Getty Images) An abnormally bad season of weather may have had a significant impact on the death toll from both World War I and the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, according to new research, with many more lives being lost due to torrential rain and plummeting temperatures. Through a detailed analysis of an ice…