Global Statistics

All countries
370,730,415
Confirmed
Updated on January 29, 2022 9:15 am
All countries
290,506,895
Recovered
Updated on January 29, 2022 9:15 am
All countries
5,669,189
Deaths
Updated on January 29, 2022 9:15 am

Global Statistics

All countries
370,730,415
Confirmed
Updated on January 29, 2022 9:15 am
All countries
290,506,895
Recovered
Updated on January 29, 2022 9:15 am
All countries
5,669,189
Deaths
Updated on January 29, 2022 9:15 am
Home Health Mutation in dominant Arizona coronavirus strain may make it more infectious

Mutation in dominant Arizona coronavirus strain may make it more infectious

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Mutation in dominant Arizona coronavirus strain may make it more infectious

A sunrise of hope. The number of people diagnosed with COVID-19 grows every day in the state with 116,892 cases and 2,082 deaths in Arizona as of July 10, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A sunrise of hope. The number of people diagnosed with COVID-19 grows every day in the state with 116,892 cases and 2,082 deaths in Arizona as of July 10, 2020.

Nick Oza/The Republic

People wait in their cars for a COVID-19 test at a drive-through testing site in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in their cars for a COVID-19 test at a drive-through testing site in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

Nick Oza/The Republic

Health care workers take samples for COVID-19 testing in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Health care workers take samples for COVID-19 testing in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

Nick Oza/The Republic

People wait in their cars for a COVID-19 test at a drive-through testing site in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in their cars for a COVID-19 test at a drive-through testing site in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

Nick Oza/The Republic

Health care workers take samples for COVID-19 testing in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Health care workers take samples for COVID-19 testing in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

Nick Oza/The Republic

Leo Caudillo waits in his car for a COVID-19 test at a drive-through testing site in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Leo Caudillo waits in his car for a COVID-19 test at a drive-through testing site in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

Nick Oza/The Republic

Health care workers prepare to take samples for COVID-19 testing in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Health care workers prepare to take samples for COVID-19 testing in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

Nick Oza/The Republic

Kimaira Robbins, 17, and Miracle Earby, 6, wait in their car for a COVID-19 test at a drive-through testing site in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Kimaira Robbins, 17, and Miracle Earby, 6, wait in their car for a COVID-19 test at a drive-through testing site in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

Nick Oza/The Republic

Driver Kim Hawkins, with Tiffany Earby, and their children, Kimaira Robbins, 17, and Miracle Earby, 6, wait in their car for a COVID-19 test at a drive-through testing site in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Driver Kim Hawkins, with Tiffany Earby, and their children, Kimaira Robbins, 17, and Miracle Earby, 6, wait in their car for a COVID-19 test at a drive-through testing site in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix on July 10, 2020.

Nick Oza/The Republic

Jose Garcia (left) receives a nasal swab test for COVID-19 at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Tests were free and vehicles waited in a line that stretched nearly 1.5 miles from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Jose Garcia (left) receives a nasal swab test for COVID-19 at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Tests were free and vehicles waited in a line that stretched nearly 1.5 miles from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Jose Garcia (left) receives a nasal swab test for COVID-19 at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Tests were free and vehicles waited in a line that stretched nearly 1.5 miles from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Jose Garcia (left) receives a nasal swab test for COVID-19 at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Tests were free and vehicles waited in a line that stretched nearly 1.5 miles from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Volunteers coordinate vehicles at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Tests were free and vehicles waited in a line that stretched nearly 1.5 miles from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Volunteers coordinate vehicles at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Tests were free and vehicles waited in a line that stretched nearly 1.5 miles from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

People wait in vehicles wait in an estimated one and a half mile line of traffic from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street for free COVID-19 testing at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in vehicles wait in an estimated one and a half mile line of traffic from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street for free COVID-19 testing at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

People wait in vehicles wait in an estimated one and a half mile line of traffic from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street for free COVID-19 testing at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in vehicles wait in an estimated one and a half mile line of traffic from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street for free COVID-19 testing at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Angelica Topka tests people for COVID-19 at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Tests were free and vehicles waited in a line that stretched nearly 1.5 miles from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Angelica Topka tests people for COVID-19 at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Tests were free and vehicles waited in a line that stretched nearly 1.5 miles from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Nikila Flagg (left) tests people for COVID-19 at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Tests were free and vehicles waited in a line that stretched nearly 1.5 miles from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Nikila Flagg (left) tests people for COVID-19 at a drive through testing site hosted by the HeroZona Foundation in the South Mountain Community College parking lot in Phoenix, Ariz. on July 9, 2020. Tests were free and vehicles waited in a line that stretched nearly 1.5 miles from Broadway Road to Baseline Road along 24th street. Earlier in the week Arizona reached number one in the world for COVID-19 cases.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Masked and gloved, Jayden Johns, 20, of Phoenix, plays basketball at Roadrunner Park in Phoenix on July 6, 2020. Johns tested positive for COVID-19 a little over three weeks ago. He self-quarantined for two weeks during which time he experienced minor symptoms. Johns, a former basketball player at Holbrook High School, grew up on the Navajo Reservation. He visits his family on the reservation almost every month although he believes he contracted the disease in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Masked and gloved, Jayden Johns, 20, of Phoenix, plays basketball at Roadrunner Park in Phoenix on July 6, 2020. Johns tested positive for COVID-19 a little over three weeks ago. He self-quarantined for two weeks during which time he experienced minor symptoms. Johns, a former basketball player at Holbrook High School, grew up on the Navajo Reservation. He visits his family on the reservation almost every month although he believes he contracted the disease in Phoenix.

David Wallace/The Republic

Masked and gloved, Jayden Johns, 20, of Phoenix, plays basketball at Roadrunner Park in Phoenix on July 6, 2020. Johns tested positive for COVID-19 a little over three weeks ago. He self-quarantined for two weeks during which time he experienced minor symptoms. Johns, a former basketball player at Holbrook High School, grew up on the Navajo Reservation. He visits his family on the reservation almost every month although he believes he contracted the disease in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Masked and gloved, Jayden Johns, 20, of Phoenix, plays basketball at Roadrunner Park in Phoenix on July 6, 2020. Johns tested positive for COVID-19 a little over three weeks ago. He self-quarantined for two weeks during which time he experienced minor symptoms. Johns, a former basketball player at Holbrook High School, grew up on the Navajo Reservation. He visits his family on the reservation almost every month although he believes he contracted the disease in Phoenix.

David Wallace/The Republic

Jul 6, 2020; Phoenix, AZ, USA; Arizona Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo pulls on his mask during an instrasquad game at summer camp workouts at Chase Field. Mandatory Credit: Rob Schumacher/The Arizona Republic via USA TODAY NETWORK

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Jul 6, 2020; Phoenix, AZ, USA; Arizona Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo pulls on his mask during an instrasquad game at summer camp workouts at Chase Field. Mandatory Credit: Rob Schumacher/The Arizona Republic via USA TODAY NETWORK

Rob Schumacher/The Republic

Jul 6, 2020; Phoenix, AZ, USA; Arizona Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo watches the instrasquad game at summer camp workouts at Chase Field. Mandatory Credit: Rob Schumacher/The Arizona Republic via USA TODAY NETWORK

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Jul 6, 2020; Phoenix, AZ, USA; Arizona Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo watches the instrasquad game at summer camp workouts at Chase Field. Mandatory Credit: Rob Schumacher/The Arizona Republic via USA TODAY NETWORK

Rob Schumacher/The Republic

Protesters light candles during a Justice for James Garcia Rally in Phoenix on July 6, 2020. The protesters were demanding the releasing of all officer body-cam footage.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Protesters light candles during a Justice for James Garcia Rally in Phoenix on July 6, 2020. The protesters were demanding the releasing of all officer body-cam footage.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Protesters light candles during a Justice for James Garcia Rally in Phoenix on July 6, 2020. The protesters were demanding the releasing of all officer body-cam footage.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Protesters light candles during a Justice for James Garcia Rally in Phoenix on July 6, 2020. The protesters were demanding the releasing of all officer body-cam footage.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Rodger Pryor dresses up for the festivities on July 4, 2020, at WestWorld in Scottsdale.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Rodger Pryor dresses up for the festivities on July 4, 2020, at WestWorld in Scottsdale.

Justin Toumberlin/The Republic

The Scottsdale firework show is seen from a sold-out WestWorld parking lot on July 4, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

The Scottsdale firework show is seen from a sold-out WestWorld parking lot on July 4, 2020.

Justin Toumberlin/The Republic

Viviana Rivas plays games with her dad, Johenry Rivas, as they wait for the firework show in Scottsdale on July 4, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Viviana Rivas plays games with her dad, Johenry Rivas, as they wait for the firework show in Scottsdale on July 4, 2020.

Justin Toumberlin/The Republic

Cars enter the parking lot of WestWorld and are placed in specific spots to account for social distancing, as the event is sold out, on July 4, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Cars enter the parking lot of WestWorld and are placed in specific spots to account for social distancing, as the event is sold out, on July 4, 2020.

Justin Toumberlin/The Republic

A box with a warning label on it related to COVID-19 and containing some of the 435,669 signatures for the InvestInEd ballot initiative is turned in at the Arizona Secretary of State's Office at the state Capitol in Phoenix on July 2, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A box with a warning label on it related to COVID-19 and containing some of the 435,669 signatures for the InvestInEd ballot initiative is turned in at the Arizona Secretary of State’s Office at the state Capitol in Phoenix on July 2, 2020.

David Wallace/The Republic

A box with a warning label on it related to COVID-19 and containing some of the 435,669 signatures for the InvestInEd ballot initiative is turned in at the Arizona Secretary of State's Office at the state Capitol in Phoenix on July 2, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A box with a warning label on it related to COVID-19 and containing some of the 435,669 signatures for the InvestInEd ballot initiative is turned in at the Arizona Secretary of State’s Office at the state Capitol in Phoenix on July 2, 2020.

David Wallace/The Republic

Mitchella Stevens, a teacher at Cartwright Elementary School, looks on as 435,669 signatures for the InvestInEd ballot initiative are turned in at the Arizona Secretary of State's Office at the state Capitol in Phoenix on July 2, 2020. The 435,669 signatures are well over the required amount to get the initiative on the ballot in the 2020 general election, which would raise more than $900 million a year for Arizona public K-12 education if approved by voters.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Mitchella Stevens, a teacher at Cartwright Elementary School, looks on as 435,669 signatures for the InvestInEd ballot initiative are turned in at the Arizona Secretary of State’s Office at the state Capitol in Phoenix on July 2, 2020. The 435,669 signatures are well over the required amount to get the initiative on the ballot in the 2020 general election, which would raise more than $900 million a year for Arizona public K-12 education if approved by voters.

David Wallace/The Republic

People line up in their cars on 24th Street to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, near South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People line up in their cars on 24th Street to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, near South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People line up in their cars on 24th Street to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, near South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People line up in their cars on 24th Street to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, near South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People line up in their cars on 24th Street to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, near South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People line up in their cars on 24th Street to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, near South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People line up in their cars on 24th Street to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, near South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People line up in their cars on 24th Street to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, near South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

Health care workers change their gloves while testing people for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Health care workers change their gloves while testing people for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

A health care worker tests a person for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A health care worker tests a person for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

A health care worker gives information to a person after testing them for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A health care worker gives information to a person after testing them for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

A health care worker tests a person for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A health care worker tests a person for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

A health care worker tests a person for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A health care worker tests a person for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wait in their cars to be tested for COVID-19 on July 2, 2020, at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

People grab drinks outside Pattie's in Scottsdale two hours before before Gov. Doug Ducey's 8 p.m. shutdown of bars, nightclubs, pools, waterparks and tubing takes effect on June 29, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People grab drinks outside Pattie’s in Scottsdale two hours before before Gov. Doug Ducey’s 8 p.m. shutdown of bars, nightclubs, pools, waterparks and tubing takes effect on June 29, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Mike Simmons, left, and his wife Milissa Simmons, right, share a drink outside Pattie's in Scottsdale before Gov. Doug Ducey's  8 p.m. ordered shutdown of bars, nightclubs, pools, waterparks and tubing takes effect on June 29, 2020. Mike and Milissa said they were not happy with the shutdown but will respect it and leave at 8 p.m.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Mike Simmons, left, and his wife Milissa Simmons, right, share a drink outside Pattie’s in Scottsdale before Gov. Doug Ducey’s 8 p.m. ordered shutdown of bars, nightclubs, pools, waterparks and tubing takes effect on June 29, 2020. Mike and Milissa said they were not happy with the shutdown but will respect it and leave at 8 p.m.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Maya Day and Nightclub with signs outside encouraging social distancing and masks are seen in Scottsdale on the night Gov. Doug Ducey ordered 8 p.m. shutdown of bars, nightclubs, pools, waterparks and tubing on June 29, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Maya Day and Nightclub with signs outside encouraging social distancing and masks are seen in Scottsdale on the night Gov. Doug Ducey ordered 8 p.m. shutdown of bars, nightclubs, pools, waterparks and tubing on June 29, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Mike Simmons, left, and his wife Milissa Simmons, right, and

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Mike Simmons, left, and his wife Milissa Simmons, right, and “Sunshine,” front, share a drink outside Pattie’s in Scottsdale two hours before Gov. Doug Ducey ordered 8 p.m. shutdown of bars, nightclubs, pools, waterparks and tubing on June 29, 2020. Mike and Milissa said they were not happy with the shutdown but will respect it and leave at 8 p.m.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

People grab drinks outside Pattie's in Scottsdale two hours before Gov. Doug Ducey's 8 p.m. shutdown of bars, nightclubs, pools, waterparks and tubing takes effect on June 29, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People grab drinks outside Pattie’s in Scottsdale two hours before Gov. Doug Ducey’s 8 p.m. shutdown of bars, nightclubs, pools, waterparks and tubing takes effect on June 29, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Riot House and the street before it in Scottsdale sits empty two hours before Gov. Doug Ducey's 8 p.m. shutdown of bars, nightclubs, pools, waterparks and tubing takes effect on June 29, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Riot House and the street before it in Scottsdale sits empty two hours before Gov. Doug Ducey’s 8 p.m. shutdown of bars, nightclubs, pools, waterparks and tubing takes effect on June 29, 2020.

Patrick Breen, Patrick Breen/The Republic

Mike Simmons, left, and his wife Milissa Simmons, right, and

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Mike Simmons, left, and his wife Milissa Simmons, right, and “Sunshine,” front, share a drink two hours before Gov. Doug Ducey’s 8 p.m. shutdown of bars, nightclubs, pools, waterparks and tubing takes effect on June 29, 2020. Mike and Milissa said they were not happy with the shutdown but will respect it and leave at 8 p.m.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey announces a new executive order in response to the rising COVID-19 cases in the state during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey announces a new executive order in response to the rising COVID-19 cases in the state during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey (center) arrives before updating reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey (center) arrives before updating reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

Michael Chow, Michael Chow/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey uses hand sanitizer before updating reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey uses hand sanitizer before updating reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

Michael Chow, Michael Chow/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey updates reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey updates reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

Michael Chow, Michael Chow/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey updates reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey updates reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

Michael Chow, Michael Chow/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey updates reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey updates reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

Michael Chow, Michael Chow/The Republic

Dr. Cara Christ updates reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Doug Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Dr. Cara Christ updates reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Doug Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

Michael Chow, Michael Chow/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey updates reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey updates reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

Michael Chow, Michael Chow/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey (center) along with Dr. Cara Christ (left) and Maj. General Michael McGuire field questions from reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey (center) along with Dr. Cara Christ (left) and Maj. General Michael McGuire field questions from reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey puts a face covering on after updating reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey puts a face covering on after updating reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 29, 2020. Gov. Ducey ordered the closing of bars, gyms, theaters, waterparks and tubing.

Michael Chow, Michael Chow/The Republic

People wear masks while carrying their tubes down to the Salt River in the Tonto National Forest near Mesa on June 28, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People wear masks while carrying their tubes down to the Salt River in the Tonto National Forest near Mesa on June 28, 2020.

Michael Chow/The Republic

People prepare to float down the Salt River in the Tonto National Forest near Mesa on June 28, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People prepare to float down the Salt River in the Tonto National Forest near Mesa on June 28, 2020.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Tubers float down the Salt River during the COVID-19 pandemic in Mesa, Arizona, on May 16, 2020. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey lifted his stay-at-home order Friday, May 15, and the day after Salt River Tubing reopened with some guidelines in place to promote safety during the pandemic.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Tubers float down the Salt River during the COVID-19 pandemic in Mesa, Arizona, on May 16, 2020. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey lifted his stay-at-home order Friday, May 15, and the day after Salt River Tubing reopened with some guidelines in place to promote safety during the pandemic.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey puts a face covering back on after speaking about the latest coronavirus data at a news conference on June 25, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey puts a face covering back on after speaking about the latest coronavirus data at a news conference on June 25, 2020, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin/Associated Press

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey uses hand sanitizer as he wears a face covering prior to speaking about the latest coronavirus data at a news conference on June 25, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey uses hand sanitizer as he wears a face covering prior to speaking about the latest coronavirus data at a news conference on June 25, 2020, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin/Associated Press

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and Arizona Department of Health Services Director Dr. Cara Christ wear face coverings as they arrive for a news conference to report the latest Arizona coronavirus data on June 25, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and Arizona Department of Health Services Director Dr. Cara Christ wear face coverings as they arrive for a news conference to report the latest Arizona coronavirus data on June 25, 2020, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin/Associated Press

Customers wear masks as they wait to enter a store in Tempe on June 17, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Customers wear masks as they wait to enter a store in Tempe on June 17, 2020.

Matt York/AP

The Arizona Department of Transportation posts new signage on along highways urging the public to wash hands due to the recent surge in coronavirus cases on June 21, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

The Arizona Department of Transportation posts new signage on along highways urging the public to wash hands due to the recent surge in coronavirus cases on June 21, 2020, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

Emelia Rhine wears a mask as she plays in the water of a splash pad at Desert Breeze Park in Chandler on June 22, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Emelia Rhine wears a mask as she plays in the water of a splash pad at Desert Breeze Park in Chandler on June 22, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Bob Anderson walks his dog Gates through a neighborhood in downtown Phoenix as the temperature approached 110 degrees on June 22, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Bob Anderson walks his dog Gates through a neighborhood in downtown Phoenix as the temperature approached 110 degrees on June 22, 2020.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Customers wear masks as they wait to enter a store in Tempe on June 17, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Customers wear masks as they wait to enter a store in Tempe on June 17, 2020.

Matt York/AP

The entrance to the H Mart Groceries & More store posts several signs letting customers know that face masks are required to enter the store on June 17, 2020, in Mesa.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

The entrance to the H Mart Groceries & More store posts several signs letting customers know that face masks are required to enter the store on June 17, 2020, in Mesa.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

People with masks on make their way around Mill Avenue in Tempe on June 20, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People with masks on make their way around Mill Avenue in Tempe on June 20, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

People without masks on make their way around Mill Avenue in Tempe on June 20, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People without masks on make their way around Mill Avenue in Tempe on June 20, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

People without masks on make their way around Mill Avenue in Tempe on June 20, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People without masks on make their way around Mill Avenue in Tempe on June 20, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

People gather to eat and drink on a Saturday night on Mill Avenue in Tempe on June 20, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People gather to eat and drink on a Saturday night on Mill Avenue in Tempe on June 20, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey along with Dr. Cara Christ, director of Arizona Department of Health Services, and Maj. Gen. Michael McGuire walk to a room to update the state on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 17, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey along with Dr. Cara Christ, director of Arizona Department of Health Services, and Maj. Gen. Michael McGuire walk to a room to update the state on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 17, 2020.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey updates the state on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 17, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey updates the state on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 17, 2020.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Maj. Gen. Michael McGuire puts his mask on after speaking to reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 17, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Maj. Gen. Michael McGuire puts his mask on after speaking to reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 17, 2020.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Dr. Cara Christ, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services, puts her mask on after speaking to reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 17, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Dr. Cara Christ, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services, puts her mask on after speaking to reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 17, 2020.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey puts his mask on after speaking to reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 17, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey puts his mask on after speaking to reporters on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 17, 2020.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Gov. Doug Ducey updates the state on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 17, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey updates the state on COVID-19 during a news conference in Phoenix on June 17, 2020.

Michael Chow/The Republic

A person is brought to a medical transport vehicle from Banner Desert Medical Center as several transports and ambulances are shown parked outside the emergency room entrance, Tuesday, June 16, 2020, in Mesa.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A person is brought to a medical transport vehicle from Banner Desert Medical Center as several transports and ambulances are shown parked outside the emergency room entrance, Tuesday, June 16, 2020, in Mesa.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

Berto Cortez, a CVS pharmacy technician, shows how COVID-19 tests are processed in a testing area set up by CVS at St. Vincent de Paul medical clinic on June 15, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Berto Cortez, a CVS pharmacy technician, shows how COVID-19 tests are processed in a testing area set up by CVS at St. Vincent de Paul medical clinic on June 15, 2020, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

Signage in Spanish at the entrance to a local post office suggests social distancing and wearing PPE, Tuesday, June 16, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Signage in Spanish at the entrance to a local post office suggests social distancing and wearing PPE, Tuesday, June 16, 2020, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

A customer stops at a drive-thru self-swab coronavirus test site at a CVS Pharmacy location on June 14, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A customer stops at a drive-thru self-swab coronavirus test site at a CVS Pharmacy location on June 14, 2020, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

Berto Cortez, a CVS pharmacy technician, shows how COVID-19 tests are processed in a testing area set up by CVS at St. Vincent de Paul medical clinic on June 15, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Berto Cortez, a CVS pharmacy technician, shows how COVID-19 tests are processed in a testing area set up by CVS at St. Vincent de Paul medical clinic on June 15, 2020, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

Signage at the entrance to a local post office suggests social distancing and wearing PPE on June 16, 2020, in Laveen.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Signage at the entrance to a local post office suggests social distancing and wearing PPE on June 16, 2020, in Laveen.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

In this May 13, 2020 file photo guests dine in-house at a restaurant in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

In this May 13, 2020 file photo guests dine in-house at a restaurant in Phoenix.

Matt York/AP

In this June 1, 2020 file photo, Kristina Washington, special education staff member at Desert Heights Preparatory Academy, walks past a series of desks and chairs at the school in Phoenix, returning to her classroom for only the second time since the coronavirus outbreak closed schools.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

In this June 1, 2020 file photo, Kristina Washington, special education staff member at Desert Heights Preparatory Academy, walks past a series of desks and chairs at the school in Phoenix, returning to her classroom for only the second time since the coronavirus outbreak closed schools.

Ross D. Franklin/AP

Arizona Republican Gov. Doug Ducey answers a question after announcing the latest coronavirus numbers and recent spike in cases during a news conference Thursday, June 11, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Arizona Republican Gov. Doug Ducey answers a question after announcing the latest coronavirus numbers and recent spike in cases during a news conference Thursday, June 11, 2020, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin, AP

Dr. Cara Christ, Director of Arizona Department of Health Services, answers a question after Arizona Republican Gov. Doug Ducey announced the latest coronavirus numbers and recent spike in cases during a news conference Thursday, June 11, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Dr. Cara Christ, Director of Arizona Department of Health Services, answers a question after Arizona Republican Gov. Doug Ducey announced the latest coronavirus numbers and recent spike in cases during a news conference Thursday, June 11, 2020, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin, AP

A patron with an appointment lines up at the St. Vincent de Paul Clinic to get a coronavirus test as the clinic has partnered with CVS Health to provide the testing Tuesday, June 9, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A patron with an appointment lines up at the St. Vincent de Paul Clinic to get a coronavirus test as the clinic has partnered with CVS Health to provide the testing Tuesday, June 9, 2020, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin, AP

The scene outside the emergency room at Banner Desert Medical Center in Mesa on June 9, 2020. Banner Health, Arizona's largest health system, has about half of the state's hospitalized COVID-19 on any given day.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

The scene outside the emergency room at Banner Desert Medical Center in Mesa on June 9, 2020. Banner Health, Arizona’s largest health system, has about half of the state’s hospitalized COVID-19 on any given day.

David Wallace/The Republic

Matthew Garcia, owner of Arizona Bio-Fogging Disinfection Services, uses a propane powered bio-fogger to disinfect the Jabz Boxing studio at 3136 E. Indian School Road in Phoenix, as the boxing fitness center for women prepares to reopen following their closure in mid March because of the COVID-19 pandemic, on May 14, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Matthew Garcia, owner of Arizona Bio-Fogging Disinfection Services, uses a propane powered bio-fogger to disinfect the Jabz Boxing studio at 3136 E. Indian School Road in Phoenix, as the boxing fitness center for women prepares to reopen following their closure in mid March because of the COVID-19 pandemic, on May 14, 2020.

David Wallace/The Republic

Father Andres Arango distributes Holy Communion while wearing a mask amid COVID-19 at Gordon Hall at St. Gregory's Catholic Church in Phoenix on May 10, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Father Andres Arango distributes Holy Communion while wearing a mask amid COVID-19 at Gordon Hall at St. Gregory’s Catholic Church in Phoenix on May 10, 2020.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Bartenders Chase Watts, right, and Luke Valenzuela make drinks at Culinary Dropout in Phoenix on May 22, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Bartenders Chase Watts, right, and Luke Valenzuela make drinks at Culinary Dropout in Phoenix on May 22, 2020.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey Dr. Cara Christ, Director of Arizona Department of Health Services, left, depart after speaking about the state's most recent coronavirus data during a news conference Thursday, May 28, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey Dr. Cara Christ, Director of Arizona Department of Health Services, left, depart after speaking about the state’s most recent coronavirus data during a news conference Thursday, May 28, 2020, in Phoenix.

Ross D. Franklin, AP

Customers drink at the bar as masked employees work at Culinary Dropout in Phoenix on May 22, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Customers drink at the bar as masked employees work at Culinary Dropout in Phoenix on May 22, 2020.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

A phone case and repair kiosk employee relaxes in between customers at Chandler Fashion Center mall in Chandler on May 23, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A phone case and repair kiosk employee relaxes in between customers at Chandler Fashion Center mall in Chandler on May 23, 2020.

, Eli Imadali/The Republic

Greg Neises, a bartender, wipes down the bar after serving a guest at the Hotel Valley Ho in Scottsdale on May 22, 2020. With demand starting to pick back up at the Hotel Valley Ho, the hotel has implemented procedures such as partitions, limiting capacity and having staff wear masks during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Greg Neises, a bartender, wipes down the bar after serving a guest at the Hotel Valley Ho in Scottsdale on May 22, 2020. With demand starting to pick back up at the Hotel Valley Ho, the hotel has implemented procedures such as partitions, limiting capacity and having staff wear masks during the COVID-19 pandemic.

David Wallace/The Republic

Rianna Vallecillo receives her diploma from principal Sarah Tolar during a senior sendoff celebration on May 21, 2020, at Marcos de Niza High School in Tempe, Ariz.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Rianna Vallecillo receives her diploma from principal Sarah Tolar during a senior sendoff celebration on May 21, 2020, at Marcos de Niza High School in Tempe, Ariz.

Sean Logan/The Republic

Actor Sean Penn records a video on a community member's phone at a food distribution point before the start of a weekend-long curfew in Coyote Canyon, New Mexico, on the Navajo Nation on May 15, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Actor Sean Penn records a video on a community member’s phone at a food distribution point before the start of a weekend-long curfew in Coyote Canyon, New Mexico, on the Navajo Nation on May 15, 2020.

David Wallace/The Republic

Al Duberchin (right, medical tech) monitor employees temperatures, including Mark Walsh (left), May 19, 2020, as they enter the Banner University Medical Center Phoenix, 1111 E. McDowell Road, Phoenix, Arizona.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Al Duberchin (right, medical tech) monitor employees temperatures, including Mark Walsh (left), May 19, 2020, as they enter the Banner University Medical Center Phoenix, 1111 E. McDowell Road, Phoenix, Arizona.

Mark Henle/The Republic

Volunteer Tuqa Alfatlawi, help Muslim community mostly from Syria, during the Food distribution at the Islamic Community Center of Phoenix. Families in need came for a drive-through service due to coronavirus for safety.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Volunteer Tuqa Alfatlawi, help Muslim community mostly from Syria, during the Food distribution at the Islamic Community Center of Phoenix. Families in need came for a drive-through service due to coronavirus for safety.

Nick Oza/The Republic

Parishioners attend Mass at St. Luke Catholic Church in Phoenix May 17, 2020. The church resumed services limited to 25% capacity after state restrictions due to the coronavirus were allowed to expire.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Parishioners attend Mass at St. Luke Catholic Church in Phoenix May 17, 2020. The church resumed services limited to 25% capacity after state restrictions due to the coronavirus were allowed to expire.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Mountain View students laugh and react to cars passing by during the Mountain View High School senior parade salute in Mesa, Ariz. on May 16, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Mountain View students laugh and react to cars passing by during the Mountain View High School senior parade salute in Mesa, Ariz. on May 16, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Graduating seniors toss their caps at 7:15pm during the Mountain View High School senior parade salute in Mesa, Ariz. on May 16, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Graduating seniors toss their caps at 7:15pm during the Mountain View High School senior parade salute in Mesa, Ariz. on May 16, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Tubers float down the Salt River during the COVID-19 pandemic in Mesa, Ariz. on May 16, 2020. Arizona Governor Doug Ducey lifted his stay-at-home order Friday, the 15, and the day after Salt River Tubing reopened with some guidelines in place to promote safety during the pandemic.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Tubers float down the Salt River during the COVID-19 pandemic in Mesa, Ariz. on May 16, 2020. Arizona Governor Doug Ducey lifted his stay-at-home order Friday, the 15, and the day after Salt River Tubing reopened with some guidelines in place to promote safety during the pandemic.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Local residents go for evening outing at Tempe Town Lake on May 14, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Local residents go for evening outing at Tempe Town Lake on May 14, 2020.

Nick Oza/The Republic

James Landry (left) and Coy Vernon train while others chill having picnic at Scottsdale Civic Center on May 14, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

James Landry (left) and Coy Vernon train while others chill having picnic at Scottsdale Civic Center on May 14, 2020.

Nick Oza/The Republic

Erin Walter, from left, Angelica Kenrick and Sheri Rearick, all with the Professional Beauty Association, participate in an online work meeting at Kenrick's home in Phoenix on May 14, 2020. Walter and Rearick surprised Kenrick on her birthday by coming to her home, to work from home. The three employees had not seen each other in weeks.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Erin Walter, from left, Angelica Kenrick and Sheri Rearick, all with the Professional Beauty Association, participate in an online work meeting at Kenrick’s home in Phoenix on May 14, 2020. Walter and Rearick surprised Kenrick on her birthday by coming to her home, to work from home. The three employees had not seen each other in weeks.

David Wallace/The Republic

May 12, 2020; Scottsdale, Arizona, USA; No spectators allowed signs at the club house during round one at the Scottsdale AZ Open at Talking Stick Golf Club's OÕodham course. This is the first semi-significant sports event to take place in the Valley since the sports shutdown in March due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Mandatory Credit: Rob Schumacher-USA TODAY Sports

The new coronavirus in Arizona

May 12, 2020; Scottsdale, Arizona, USA; No spectators allowed signs at the club house during round one at the Scottsdale AZ Open at Talking Stick Golf Club’s OÕodham course. This is the first semi-significant sports event to take place in the Valley since the sports shutdown in March due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Mandatory Credit: Rob Schumacher-USA TODAY Sports

Rob Schumacher, Rob Schumacher-USA TODAY Sports

People pack into CASA Tempe on the first day of dine in reopening in Tempe on May 11, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People pack into CASA Tempe on the first day of dine in reopening in Tempe on May 11, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

People pack into CASA Tempe on the first day of dine-in reopening in Tempe on May 11, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People pack into CASA Tempe on the first day of dine-in reopening in Tempe on May 11, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Lo-Lo's Chicken & Waffles offers dine in services after more than a month of take out only due to COVID-19 in Phoenix, Ariz. on May 11, 2020. Many restaurants around Arizona began reopening dining services as Arizona Governor Doug Ducey lifted some restrictions under the COVID-19 lock down.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Lo-Lo’s Chicken & Waffles offers dine in services after more than a month of take out only due to COVID-19 in Phoenix, Ariz. on May 11, 2020. Many restaurants around Arizona began reopening dining services as Arizona Governor Doug Ducey lifted some restrictions under the COVID-19 lock down.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

From left, Kiaya Stearns, Cae Stearns, Heather Stears and Landen Stearns wave to their grandparents above, Harry and Jeanne Sharkey, during a drive-by Mother's Day parade at LivGenerations, a senior-living community in Ahwatukee, on May 10, 2020. Seeing their grandparents' reaction to the parade said it all, they said.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

From left, Kiaya Stearns, Cae Stearns, Heather Stears and Landen Stearns wave to their grandparents above, Harry and Jeanne Sharkey, during a drive-by Mother’s Day parade at LivGenerations, a senior-living community in Ahwatukee, on May 10, 2020. Seeing their grandparents’ reaction to the parade said it all, they said. “It felt amazing,” Heather Stearns said.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

Sarah Lawrence gets tested for COVID-19 by a Dignity Health medical worker at a drive-up testing site at State Farm Stadium from Dignity Health and the Arizona Cardinals in Glendale on Saturday, May 9, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Sarah Lawrence gets tested for COVID-19 by a Dignity Health medical worker at a drive-up testing site at State Farm Stadium from Dignity Health and the Arizona Cardinals in Glendale on Saturday, May 9, 2020.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

Dignity Health medical workers Stephanie Tyrin and Shannon Miller relax in between patients at a drive-up coronavirus testing site at State Farm Stadium from Dignity Health and the Arizona Cardinals in Glendale on Saturday, May 9, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Dignity Health medical workers Stephanie Tyrin and Shannon Miller relax in between patients at a drive-up coronavirus testing site at State Farm Stadium from Dignity Health and the Arizona Cardinals in Glendale on Saturday, May 9, 2020.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

From left, manager David Grady and owner Mimi Nguyen do mother and daughter customers Tonna and Elaina Yutze's nails at AZ Nails Spa 101 near the P83 Entertainment District in Peoria on May 8, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

From left, manager David Grady and owner Mimi Nguyen do mother and daughter customers Tonna and Elaina Yutze’s nails at AZ Nails Spa 101 near the P83 Entertainment District in Peoria on May 8, 2020.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

Matthew Gallegos (left) cuts Justin Beam's hair (right) inside of his shop Matt's Barber Parlor in Phoenix, Ariz. on May 8, 2020. After Arizona Governor Doug Ducey allowed salons, barbershops, and other retail stores to resume businesses many barbershops and salons in Phoenix began taking clients by appointment only.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Matthew Gallegos (left) cuts Justin Beam’s hair (right) inside of his shop Matt’s Barber Parlor in Phoenix, Ariz. on May 8, 2020. After Arizona Governor Doug Ducey allowed salons, barbershops, and other retail stores to resume businesses many barbershops and salons in Phoenix began taking clients by appointment only.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Jets sit parked near the run way at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport on May 7, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Jets sit parked near the run way at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport on May 7, 2020.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Volunteers, including Andy Torres (center) wait to load food boxes, May 6, 2020, during a St Mary’s Food Bank mobile distribution at the Gila River Arena, 9400 West Maryland, Glendale.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Volunteers, including Andy Torres (center) wait to load food boxes, May 6, 2020, during a St Mary’s Food Bank mobile distribution at the Gila River Arena, 9400 West Maryland, Glendale.

Mark Henle/The Republic

President Trump tours Honeywell International’s mask-making operation in Phoenix May 5, 2020. Honeywell added manufacturing capabilities in Phoenix to produce N95 face masks in support of the governments response to COVID-19.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

President Trump tours Honeywell International’s mask-making operation in Phoenix May 5, 2020. Honeywell added manufacturing capabilities in Phoenix to produce N95 face masks in support of the governments response to COVID-19.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey (front), Sen. Martha McSally (back left) and Rep Debbie Lesko (right) wear masks while waiting for President Trump to speak at Honeywell International’s mask-making operation in Phoenix May 5, 2020. Honeywell added manufacturing capabilities in Phoenix to produce N95 face masks in support of the governments response to COVID-19.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey (front), Sen. Martha McSally (back left) and Rep Debbie Lesko (right) wear masks while waiting for President Trump to speak at Honeywell International’s mask-making operation in Phoenix May 5, 2020. Honeywell added manufacturing capabilities in Phoenix to produce N95 face masks in support of the governments response to COVID-19.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Phoenix Fire Department helped Bea Markow celebrate her 100th birthday, while keeping social distancing in mind.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Phoenix Fire Department helped Bea Markow celebrate her 100th birthday, while keeping social distancing in mind.

Phoenix Fire Department

The staff of Hood Burger outside Cobra Arcade Bar in downtown Phoenix on May 2, 2020. Hood Burger, a nonprofit pop-up eatery, is offering food to help the Arizona Coalition to Arizona Coalition to End Sexual & Domestic Violence.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

The staff of Hood Burger outside Cobra Arcade Bar in downtown Phoenix on May 2, 2020. Hood Burger, a nonprofit pop-up eatery, is offering food to help the Arizona Coalition to Arizona Coalition to End Sexual & Domestic Violence.

Nick Oza/The Republic

Demonstrators listen to speakers during a rally for the governor to open the state at Wesley Bolin Plaza in Phoenix. Organizers of the event say that quarantine is for the sick and not the healthy. May 3, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Demonstrators listen to speakers during a rally for the governor to open the state at Wesley Bolin Plaza in Phoenix. Organizers of the event say that quarantine is for the sick and not the healthy. May 3, 2020.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Derick Asturias gets tested for the novel coronavirus during the testing blitz at Valle del Sol, a testing site in Phoenix on May 2, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Derick Asturias gets tested for the novel coronavirus during the testing blitz at Valle del Sol, a testing site in Phoenix on May 2, 2020.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

Jets with Luke Air Force Base and the Arizona National Guard fly over the valley near Luke Air Force base to honor people fighting on the front lines of the COVID-19 virus in Ariz. on May 1, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Jets with Luke Air Force Base and the Arizona National Guard fly over the valley near Luke Air Force base to honor people fighting on the front lines of the COVID-19 virus in Ariz. on May 1, 2020.

Thomas Hawthorne, Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Healthcare professionals take a selfie outside Valleywise Health Medical Center as they wait for a flyover from the Arizona National Guard to honor essential workers in Phoenix, Ariz. on May 1, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Healthcare professionals take a selfie outside Valleywise Health Medical Center as they wait for a flyover from the Arizona National Guard to honor essential workers in Phoenix, Ariz. on May 1, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Brandy Nieman, on left, and Jill Cunningham rides in a bus in downtown Phoenix. Valley Metro Transit System will be reducing their services due to Covid-19.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Brandy Nieman, on left, and Jill Cunningham rides in a bus in downtown Phoenix. Valley Metro Transit System will be reducing their services due to Covid-19.

Nick Oza/The Republic

Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald speaks to the media before dropping off food to medical workers April 29, 2020. Fitzgerald was dropping off food from Ocean 44 Restaurant to various health care workers helping with COVID-19.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Arizona Cardinals wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald speaks to the media before dropping off food to medical workers April 29, 2020. Fitzgerald was dropping off food from Ocean 44 Restaurant to various health care workers helping with COVID-19.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Quyen Bach (left) and Chris French have their photos taken by Kim Ly at Papago Park in Phoenix on April 29, 2020. Both are graduating from A.T. Still University Arizona School of Dentistry.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Quyen Bach (left) and Chris French have their photos taken by Kim Ly at Papago Park in Phoenix on April 29, 2020. Both are graduating from A.T. Still University Arizona School of Dentistry.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Jamie Doles lays with her daughter Paisley, 3, as they watch the Book of Life at the Digital Drive-In AZ in Mesa, Ariz. on April 20, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Jamie Doles lays with her daughter Paisley, 3, as they watch the Book of Life at the Digital Drive-In AZ in Mesa, Ariz. on April 20, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

A health care worker stands in counter protest as people march towards the Arizona State Capitol in protest of Gov. Doug Ducey's stay-at-home order to combat the coronavirus April 20, 2020. They were urging the governor to re-open the state.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A health care worker stands in counter protest as people march towards the Arizona State Capitol in protest of Gov. Doug Ducey’s stay-at-home order to combat the coronavirus April 20, 2020. They were urging the governor to re-open the state.

Michael Chow/The Republic

The copper dome and Winged Victory statue over the Arizona State Capitol is illuminated with blue light in Phoenix during the

The new coronavirus in Arizona

The copper dome and Winged Victory statue over the Arizona State Capitol is illuminated with blue light in Phoenix during the “Light It Blue” campaign across the United States to honor essential front-line workers and health care professionals during the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic.

Rob Schumacher/The Republic

United Food Bank volunteers and National Guard soldiers distribute care packages to families on April 17, 2020, at the Mesa Convention Center in Mesa, Ariz.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

United Food Bank volunteers and National Guard soldiers distribute care packages to families on April 17, 2020, at the Mesa Convention Center in Mesa, Ariz.

Sean Logan/The Republic

Melissa Read breaks down cardboard boxes while United Food Bank volunteers and National Guard soldiers distribute care packages to families on April 17, 2020, at the Mesa Convention Center in Mesa, Ariz.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Melissa Read breaks down cardboard boxes while United Food Bank volunteers and National Guard soldiers distribute care packages to families on April 17, 2020, at the Mesa Convention Center in Mesa, Ariz.

Sean Logan/The Republic

Bruce Forstrom, a volunteer with United Food Bank, prepares emergency food bags at the United Food Bank warehouse in Mesa on April 16, 2020. Despite the increased need because of the coronavirus pandemic, United Food Bank has seen an over 60 percent decrease in volunteers, also because of the pandemic, according to Tyson Nansel, United Food Bank director of public and media relations.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Bruce Forstrom, a volunteer with United Food Bank, prepares emergency food bags at the United Food Bank warehouse in Mesa on April 16, 2020. Despite the increased need because of the coronavirus pandemic, United Food Bank has seen an over 60 percent decrease in volunteers, also because of the pandemic, according to Tyson Nansel, United Food Bank director of public and media relations.

David Wallace/The Republic

A rider wears a mask over her face while traveling east on the Arizona Canal Trail near Goldwater Blvd and East 5th Ave. in Scottsdale. Apr. 15, 2020

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A rider wears a mask over her face while traveling east on the Arizona Canal Trail near Goldwater Blvd and East 5th Ave. in Scottsdale. Apr. 15, 2020

Rob Schumacher/The Republic

James Smith, with Balfour, the company that sells graduations caps and gowns, hands a cap, gown and grad box which includes graduation mailing announcements, to a Skyline high school graduating senior as they pick them up from their vehicle at Skyline high school in Mesa on April 14, 2020. Tom Brennan, principal of Skyline, says he is unsure what kind of graduation ceremony they will have, if any at all, because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

James Smith, with Balfour, the company that sells graduations caps and gowns, hands a cap, gown and grad box which includes graduation mailing announcements, to a Skyline high school graduating senior as they pick them up from their vehicle at Skyline high school in Mesa on April 14, 2020. Tom Brennan, principal of Skyline, says he is unsure what kind of graduation ceremony they will have, if any at all, because of the coronavirus pandemic.

David Wallace/The Republic

Frances Rozzen, wearing a mask because of the coronavirus pandemic, looks at the near empty shelves of  toilet paper and paper towels at the Safeway grocery store on 16th Street and Southern Avenue in Phoenix on April 13, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Frances Rozzen, wearing a mask because of the coronavirus pandemic, looks at the near empty shelves of toilet paper and paper towels at the Safeway grocery store on 16th Street and Southern Avenue in Phoenix on April 13, 2020.

David Wallace/The Republic

A masked golfer tees off on the 12th hole, April 13, 2020, at Arizona Grand Golf Course, 8000 S, Arizona Grand Parkway, Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A masked golfer tees off on the 12th hole, April 13, 2020, at Arizona Grand Golf Course, 8000 S, Arizona Grand Parkway, Phoenix.

Mark Henle/The Republic

Kathy Jacobsen signals to her mother, Audrey Wilson, 80, who has dementia, through the glass pane of a door, at Arbor Rose Senior Center in Mesa on April 1, 2020. Jacobsen was taking her mother out of the facility because of concerns of a coronavirus outbreak within the facility. She is moving her mother in with her at her Gilbert home. Jacobsen had not be able to visit her mother inside the facility because of the coronavirus pandemic since early March.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Kathy Jacobsen signals to her mother, Audrey Wilson, 80, who has dementia, through the glass pane of a door, at Arbor Rose Senior Center in Mesa on April 1, 2020. Jacobsen was taking her mother out of the facility because of concerns of a coronavirus outbreak within the facility. She is moving her mother in with her at her Gilbert home. Jacobsen had not be able to visit her mother inside the facility because of the coronavirus pandemic since early March.

David Wallace/The Republic

Charlie and Stacy Derouen raise their hands as they listen to Pastor Jason Anderson during an Easter drive-in service at the Living World Bible Church in Mesa, Ariz. on April 12, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Charlie and Stacy Derouen raise their hands as they listen to Pastor Jason Anderson during an Easter drive-in service at the Living World Bible Church in Mesa, Ariz. on April 12, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Friends catch up on conversation and practice social distancing in an empty shopping center in Phoenix on April 11, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Friends catch up on conversation and practice social distancing in an empty shopping center in Phoenix on April 11, 2020.

Michael Meister/The Republic

Apr. 10, 2020; Phoenix, AZ, USA; A cross tops the steeple at Dream City Church in Phoenix during the sunrise on Good Friday. Most churches across the United States will be empty on Easter Sunday due to the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Apr. 10, 2020; Phoenix, AZ, USA; A cross tops the steeple at Dream City Church in Phoenix during the sunrise on Good Friday. Most churches across the United States will be empty on Easter Sunday due to the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic.

Rob Schumacher/The Republic

Damion Holliday (left) and Andrew Morales wait for their flight to San Diego at Terminal 4 on April 9, 2020, at Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Damion Holliday (left) and Andrew Morales wait for their flight to San Diego at Terminal 4 on April 9, 2020, at Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

Airport employees touch their feet together at Terminal 4 on April 9, 2020, at Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Airport employees touch their feet together at Terminal 4 on April 9, 2020, at Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

Chalk messages written on a sidewalk in a Tempe neighborhood, reference the coronavirus pandemic on April 8, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Chalk messages written on a sidewalk in a Tempe neighborhood, reference the coronavirus pandemic on April 8, 2020.

David Wallace/The Republic

Bryan Harding, who works in real estate, works on his front porch in the Maple-Ash neighborhood of Tempe on April 9, 2020. Harding says he likes to work outside because it gives him his own space while his wife works inside.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Bryan Harding, who works in real estate, works on his front porch in the Maple-Ash neighborhood of Tempe on April 9, 2020. Harding says he likes to work outside because it gives him his own space while his wife works inside.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

People at Living Word Bible Church attend a

The new coronavirus in Arizona

People at Living Word Bible Church attend a “drive-in church service” in Mesa, Ariz. April 5, 2020. The coronavirus pandemic has forced churches to come up with new ways to hold service while social distancing. People are encouraged to honk for amen.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Zacona Michaux hands out lunches at Edison Elementary School in Mesa on April 9, 2020. Mesa school district is having trouble getting food supplies and is having to scale back on meal distribution. Edison elementary meal site is closing effective April 10. Starting April 13 meals can be picked up a Kino Junior High (Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays).

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Zacona Michaux hands out lunches at Edison Elementary School in Mesa on April 9, 2020. Mesa school district is having trouble getting food supplies and is having to scale back on meal distribution. Edison elementary meal site is closing effective April 10. Starting April 13 meals can be picked up a Kino Junior High (Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays).


Cheryl Evans/The Republic

Haim Ainsworth and his son, Jacob Shapiro-Ainsworth, 11, share a laugh during an online Seder during the first night of the Jewish holiday of Passover at their home in Tempe on April 8, 2020. The Seder which included members from Temple Emanuel was being held online because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Haim Ainsworth and his son, Jacob Shapiro-Ainsworth, 11, share a laugh during an online Seder during the first night of the Jewish holiday of Passover at their home in Tempe on April 8, 2020. The Seder which included members from Temple Emanuel was being held online because of the coronavirus pandemic.

David Wallace/The Republic

Apr. 7, 2020; Phoenix, AZ, USA; The supermoon, also known as the pink moon rises over the Papago Park Buttes, it is the biggest and brightest supermoon of 2020. The coronavirus has changed our lives as social distancing is in our lives

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Apr. 7, 2020; Phoenix, AZ, USA; The supermoon, also known as the pink moon rises over the Papago Park Buttes, it is the biggest and brightest supermoon of 2020. The coronavirus has changed our lives as social distancing is in our lives

Rob Schumacher/The Republic

Cowboy Club employee Jonathan Castillo wipes down a shelf in Sedona on April 7, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Cowboy Club employee Jonathan Castillo wipes down a shelf in Sedona on April 7, 2020.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

More than 1,000 rental cars sit in a parking lot near Priest Dr. and Van Buren St. in Phoenix, Ariz. on April 6, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

More than 1,000 rental cars sit in a parking lot near Priest Dr. and Van Buren St. in Phoenix, Ariz. on April 6, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Vista Monterey Park in Mesa, Ariz. is closed  because of the coronavirus pandemic April 5, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Vista Monterey Park in Mesa, Ariz. is closed because of the coronavirus pandemic April 5, 2020.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Dikeya Williams stands for a portrait outside Safeway in Phoenix on April 5, 2020. She's worn her mask, complete with a stapled on image of teeth with grillz and fangs, for two weeks and works as a child care director and provider.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Dikeya Williams stands for a portrait outside Safeway in Phoenix on April 5, 2020. She’s worn her mask, complete with a stapled on image of teeth with grillz and fangs, for two weeks and works as a child care director and provider.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

Mary Vale (left) and Becky Leuluai wait to give out care packages to hotel employees on April 3, 2020, at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Mary Vale (left) and Becky Leuluai wait to give out care packages to hotel employees on April 3, 2020, at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

Dee Madden has her hair washed at The Savvy Stylist on a quiet Friday afternoon at the Tempe hair salon on April 3, 2020, just before Gov. Doug Ducey ordered hair and nail salons to be shut down by 5 p.m. on Saturday. Many people are avoiding hair care during the new coronavirus pandemic due to its hands-on nature.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Dee Madden has her hair washed at The Savvy Stylist on a quiet Friday afternoon at the Tempe hair salon on April 3, 2020, just before Gov. Doug Ducey ordered hair and nail salons to be shut down by 5 p.m. on Saturday. Many people are avoiding hair care during the new coronavirus pandemic due to its hands-on nature.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

Farmworkers harvest iceberg lettuce, April 2, 2020, in a Desert Premium Farms field, south of Welton, Arizona.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Farmworkers harvest iceberg lettuce, April 2, 2020, in a Desert Premium Farms field, south of Welton, Arizona.

Mark Henle/The Republic

Colton Williams with Crescent Crown Distributing, delivers beer to Tops Liquors in Tempe, Ariz., on April 2, 2020. Tops Liquors has seen an 40 percent increase in sales in the last two weeks.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Colton Williams with Crescent Crown Distributing, delivers beer to Tops Liquors in Tempe, Ariz., on April 2, 2020. Tops Liquors has seen an 40 percent increase in sales in the last two weeks.

Cheryl Evans/The Republic

Isolation tents are set up for homeless persons showing symptoms of COVID-19 at the Central Arizona Shelter Services in Phoenix, Ariz. on April 2, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Isolation tents are set up for homeless persons showing symptoms of COVID-19 at the Central Arizona Shelter Services in Phoenix, Ariz. on April 2, 2020.

Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

The City of Phoenix closes park amenities due to the COVID-19 health crisis on the first day of Gov. Doug Ducey's

The new coronavirus in Arizona

The City of Phoenix closes park amenities due to the COVID-19 health crisis on the first day of Gov. Doug Ducey’s “stay at home” order at Steele Indian School Park in Phoenix.

Rob Schumacher/The Republic

A woman holds a baby outside of the lobby at Banner University Medical Center Phoenix on the first day of Gov. Doug Ducey's

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A woman holds a baby outside of the lobby at Banner University Medical Center Phoenix on the first day of Gov. Doug Ducey’s “stay at home” order on April 1, 2020, in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

Paige Mulvey, 7, touches hands with her grandmother, Kathy Holcombe, 66, through a door window at her home on March 30, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Paige Mulvey, 7, touches hands with her grandmother, Kathy Holcombe, 66, through a door window at her home on March 30, 2020, in Phoenix.

Sean Logan/The Republic

A sign hangs at the front gate to Coyote Ranch, in Yuma, Ariz., Monday, March 29, 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A sign hangs at the front gate to Coyote Ranch, in Yuma, Ariz., Monday, March 29, 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Randy Hoeft, AP

Gov. Doug Ducey listens to speakers on COVID-19 during a news conference at the Arizona Commerce Authority in Phoenix March 30, 2020. Gov. Ducey issued a stay at home order effective close of business March 31.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Gov. Doug Ducey listens to speakers on COVID-19 during a news conference at the Arizona Commerce Authority in Phoenix March 30, 2020. Gov. Ducey issued a stay at home order effective close of business March 31.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Dr. Warren Stewart Sr., senior pastor, speaks during a live-streamed Sunday service at First Institutional Baptist Church in Phoenix on March 29, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Dr. Warren Stewart Sr., senior pastor, speaks during a live-streamed Sunday service at First Institutional Baptist Church in Phoenix on March 29, 2020.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

U.S. Army National Guard specialist Frank Rezzano and U.S. Air Force technical sergeant Justin Emanuelson stock shelves at Basha's grocery store in Scottsdale on March 28, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

U.S. Army National Guard specialist Frank Rezzano and U.S. Air Force technical sergeant Justin Emanuelson stock shelves at Basha’s grocery store in Scottsdale on March 28, 2020.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

A heart of lighted rooms done by Sheraton Phoenix Downtown on March 27, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A heart of lighted rooms done by Sheraton Phoenix Downtown on March 27, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Timothy Leonard, 73, shops for groceries at Los Altos Ranch Market during the coronavirus pandemic in Phoenix on March 27, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Timothy Leonard, 73, shops for groceries at Los Altos Ranch Market during the coronavirus pandemic in Phoenix on March 27, 2020.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

Adam Hansen, a doctor from Redirect Health in Glendale, takes a swab from a patient in a drive-thru to test for flu and coronavirus on March 25, 2020. Medicare and some insurance plans will cover the testing (with normal co-pays and deductibles) or there is a $49 self-pay option. Experts say it's important to get a test inside the first 48 hours of symptoms starting.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Adam Hansen, a doctor from Redirect Health in Glendale, takes a swab from a patient in a drive-thru to test for flu and coronavirus on March 25, 2020. Medicare and some insurance plans will cover the testing (with normal co-pays and deductibles) or there is a $49 self-pay option. Experts say it’s important to get a test inside the first 48 hours of symptoms starting.

Nick Oza/The Republic

Medical assistant Mary Hermiz checks a sample from a patient at a Glendale drive-thru that tests for flu and coronavirus on March 25, 2020.  Medicare and some insurance plans will cover the testing (with normal co-pays and deductibles) or there is a $49 self-pay option. Experts say it's important to get a test inside the first 48 hours of symptoms starting.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Medical assistant Mary Hermiz checks a sample from a patient at a Glendale drive-thru that tests for flu and coronavirus on March 25, 2020. Medicare and some insurance plans will cover the testing (with normal co-pays and deductibles) or there is a $49 self-pay option. Experts say it’s important to get a test inside the first 48 hours of symptoms starting.

Nick Oza/The Republic

As many Phoenicians work from home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Central Avenue appears empty and void of traffic in downtown Phoenix on March 25, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

As many Phoenicians work from home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Central Avenue appears empty and void of traffic in downtown Phoenix on March 25, 2020.

Michael Chow and Thomas Hawthorne/The Republic

Spc. Sofia Pez (left) and Spc. Juan Sandoval load a box into a client's vehicle on March 25, 2020, at the St. Mary's Food Bank Alliance in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Spc. Sofia Pez (left) and Spc. Juan Sandoval load a box into a client’s vehicle on March 25, 2020, at the St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance in Phoenix.

Mark Henle/The Republic

Emily Miles has her temperature taken before being allowed to donate blood at a temporary blood bank set up in a church's fellowship hall Tuesday, March 24, 2020, in Tempe, Ariz. Schools and businesses that typically host blood drives are temporarily closed due to precautionary measures in place to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus leading to extremely low levels of blood availability throughout the state.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Emily Miles has her temperature taken before being allowed to donate blood at a temporary blood bank set up in a church’s fellowship hall Tuesday, March 24, 2020, in Tempe, Ariz. Schools and businesses that typically host blood drives are temporarily closed due to precautionary measures in place to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus leading to extremely low levels of blood availability throughout the state.

Matt York, AP

Shawn Ray, owner of S2 Armament LLC, tells a customer that nearly all inventory of firearms and ammo are sold out at Patriot Nation Firearms and Accessories in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Shawn Ray, owner of S2 Armament LLC, tells a customer that nearly all inventory of firearms and ammo are sold out at Patriot Nation Firearms and Accessories in Phoenix.

David Wallace/The Republic

John White, 9, decorates his mother's van before a parade for Val Vista Lakes Elementary School students in their neighborhoods on March 23, 2020, in Gilbert, Ariz.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

John White, 9, decorates his mother’s van before a parade for Val Vista Lakes Elementary School students in their neighborhoods on March 23, 2020, in Gilbert, Ariz.

Sean Logan/The Republic

Banner UMC’s drive-up system in Tucson is for emergency room triage for a variety of illnesses and is not for random testing for COVID-19. It has been put in place to keep crowds from the ER and protect the health of patients and staff.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Banner UMC’s drive-up system in Tucson is for emergency room triage for a variety of illnesses and is not for random testing for COVID-19. It has been put in place to keep crowds from the ER and protect the health of patients and staff.

Josh Galemore/Arizona Daily Star

Toliet paper offered with frame purchases at the downtown Farmer's Market in Phoenix, Ariz. on March 21, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Toliet paper offered with frame purchases at the downtown Farmer’s Market in Phoenix, Ariz. on March 21, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

Sheena Williams of Nature's Medicines announcing to keep a distance from each other from long lines for people who are in need with their medical card. Because of the new law on gathering, they were allowing five people at the time, and everyone was keeping a distance from themselves to get their Medicine.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Sheena Williams of Nature’s Medicines announcing to keep a distance from each other from long lines for people who are in need with their medical card. Because of the new law on gathering, they were allowing five people at the time, and everyone was keeping a distance from themselves to get their Medicine.

Nick Oza/The Republic

A tent for extra hospital beds is pictured at the Phoenix VA on March 19, 2020, in Phoenix.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A tent for extra hospital beds is pictured at the Phoenix VA on March 19, 2020, in Phoenix.

Eli Imadali/The Republic

Customers wait for the doors to open, March 17, 2020, at Target, 1818 E. Baseline Road, Tempe.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Customers wait for the doors to open, March 17, 2020, at Target, 1818 E. Baseline Road, Tempe.

Mark Henle/The Republic

Individuals are tested for COVID-19, also known as the coronavirus at a mobile clinic set up in the parking lot at the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix on the morning of March 18, 2020. Only Mayo Clinic patients with a doctor's order could use the mobile clinic. A slow but steady stream of vehicles was passing through the mobile clinic on Wednesday morning.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Individuals are tested for COVID-19, also known as the coronavirus at a mobile clinic set up in the parking lot at the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix on the morning of March 18, 2020. Only Mayo Clinic patients with a doctor’s order could use the mobile clinic. A slow but steady stream of vehicles was passing through the mobile clinic on Wednesday morning.

David Wallace/The Republic

Mar. 18, 2020; Grand Canyon National Park, AZ, USA; Two Taiwanese tourists wear N-95 masks while taking in the view at Mather Point at Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. Due to the coronavirus COVID-19, park entrance fees are suspended, shuttle bus service is suspended and visitor centers are closed.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Mar. 18, 2020; Grand Canyon National Park, AZ, USA; Two Taiwanese tourists wear N-95 masks while taking in the view at Mather Point at Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona. Due to the coronavirus COVID-19, park entrance fees are suspended, shuttle bus service is suspended and visitor centers are closed.

Rob Schumacher/The Republic

A customers grabs a package of toilet paper on March 18, 2020, at a Target store in Tempe. Target is only allowing one per customer.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A customers grabs a package of toilet paper on March 18, 2020, at a Target store in Tempe. Target is only allowing one per customer.

Mark Henle/The Republic

Customers grab toilet paper on March 18, 2020, at a Target store in Tempe. Target is only allowing one per customer.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Customers grab toilet paper on March 18, 2020, at a Target store in Tempe. Target is only allowing one per customer.

Mark Henle/The Republic

Hikers watch the sun set from the top of

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Hikers watch the sun set from the top of “A” Mountain in Tempe on March 17, 2020.

Michael Chow/The Republic

Juliana Posso (L) and Evan Davis during the Brides of March bar crawl at the Churchill in Phoenix, Ariz. on March 13, 2020.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Juliana Posso (L) and Evan Davis during the Brides of March bar crawl at the Churchill in Phoenix, Ariz. on March 13, 2020.

Patrick Breen/The Republic

A sign announces that Major League Baseball has suspended the 2020 spring training season, this is in response to the COVID-19 virus health emergency on March 13, 2020 at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick in Scottsdale.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

A sign announces that Major League Baseball has suspended the 2020 spring training season, this is in response to the COVID-19 virus health emergency on March 13, 2020 at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick in Scottsdale.

Rob Schumacher/The Republic

Robert Truman, with SSC Services for Education, uses an electrostatic sprayer to sanitize a classroom on March 12, 2020, at Kyrene de la Mirada Elementary School in Chandler.

The new coronavirus in Arizona

Robert Truman, with SSC Services for Education, uses an electrostatic sprayer to sanitize a classroom on March 12, 2020, at Kyrene de la Mirada Elementary School in Chandler.

Mark Henle/The Republic

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The new coronavirus in Arizona

A sunrise of hope. The number of people diagnosed with COVID-19 grows every day in the state with 116,892 cases and 2,082 deaths in Arizona as of July 10, 2020.

, Arizona Republic
Published 7:00 a.m. MT July 11, 2020 | Updated 7:28 a.m. MT July 11, 2020

CLOSE

Over 90 percent of novel coronavirus samples from Arizona in a recent genetic analysis have a mutation that researchers hypothesize makes the virus more infectious.

So far, researchers have analyzed more than 1,400 samples of the virus from patients with COVID-19 and have identified a mutated strain that they believe could help explain the recent explosion of cases in the state.

This genetic mutation affects the spikes on the outside of the virus that the virus uses to attach to and infect host cells.

Because of the mutation’s crucial location, it could change the way the spikes operate to infect people, making the virus more transmissible, according to David Engelthaler, co-director of the Translational Genomics Research Institute’s Pathogen and Microbiome Division.

“That might be why it’s become the dominant strain that has really moved through Europe and the Americas and certainly what we see here in Arizona,” he said.

This mutated strain of the virus is the same one that researchers first identified in April as the dominant strain in Arizona and seems to have originated in Europe. Researchers initially thought that this strain was no more infectious than other strains, but was merely dominant due to chance.

However, given additional data, researchers now believe this strain behaves differently than others.

“The earlier strains that came into Arizona didn’t have this mutation and those strains didn’t go on in most cases to cause any type of sustained outbreaks,” Engelthaler said. “They typically fizzled out.”

The mutation itself is called the D614G mutation, which Dr. Anthony Fauci acknowledged as seeming to improve the virus’s ability to replicate. 

The next important question is whether this more-spreadable strain is just as deadly as others.

In an interview with the Journal of the American Medical Association’s Dr. Howard Bauchner, Fauci said, “We don’t have a connection to whether an individual does worse with this or not; it just seems that the virus replicates better and may be more transmissible.”

In the interview, Fauci cautioned that researchers still need to confirm these theories and analyze the mutation further.

Engelthaler thinks this mutation could be making the virus less deadly.

“It’s really hard to directly link the fatality rate to the strain of the virus,” he said. “But I think there’s more evidence that the fatality rates are dropping.”

According to data released by the Arizona Department of Health Services, there had been a total of 14,796 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 802 COVID-19 related deaths in Arizona by May 15, when Gov. Doug Ducey’s stay-at-home order expired. This translates to roughly a 5.4% death rate from the virus in the state.

As of July 9, there have been a total of 112,671 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 2,038 COVID-19 related deaths statewide, translating to about a 1.8% death rate from the virus. 

However, this decreased fatality rate could be because of increased testing statewide, which has allowed the state to better track the total number of coronavirus cases, whereas early numbers may be more likely to only reflect more severe, hospitalized cases. 

More cases also are now confirmed among younger patients, who typically have a lower fatality rate. 

On May 15, people age 20-44 accounted for 39% of all confirmed cases in Maricopa County. As of July 9, they accounted for 53%.

However, Engelthaler pointed out that the death rate within higher risk age groups has been falling as well. According to Maricopa County’s data, about 17% of those who had the disease and were 65 or older died as of May 15. Today the death rate among those infected within that age group hovers around 10%.

“We can’t necessarily say that it’s directly related to any specific mutations yet in the virus,” he said. “But right now, there certainly is an association.”

However, he stressed that this doesn’t mean the state should relax precautions against transmissions.

“We still need to do everything we can to protect those at most risk,” he said.

It’s also important to continue to keep track of virus mutations and try to better understand this spike protein mutation, because any mutations could have a big impact on how effective potential vaccines or treatments are.

In particular, since many vaccines and therapeutic drugs are targeting the spikes on the outside of the virus, any harmful mutation on the spike protein could render vaccines useless. 

So far, no mutations, including this one, have been found to interfere with vaccine development that is underway, according to Engelthaler.

“We can’t say for sure whether or not mutations will cause a negative effect for these vaccines,” he said. “But there’s no evidence right now to indicate that they would have a negative impact or that the vaccines wouldn’t work.”

Each time a virus infects a new host, it has another opportunity to mutate. Since this new coronavirus has had the chance to move rapidly across the globe, Engelthaler said it’s likely that this will create multiple versions of this virus.

These different versions may have different characteristics or may not all respond to the same vaccines or treatments.

“Hopefully with vaccines, we can whittle those down and just knock down the total amount of transmission,” he said. “I think trying to get it to completely go away is certainly not within reach right now, even with a good vaccine program.”

In addition to mapping out a genetic family tree of the novel coronavirus so that researchers can better understand and research the various strains, TGen will use their genetic analysis to improve the accuracy of the state’s COVID-19 contact tracing efforts. 

Engelthaler said TGen hopes to better understand how different strains of the virus are spreading so that they can better limit transmission.

“The virus itself is going to tell us what we need to focus on,” he said. “And clearly what we’re seeing now is this particular mutation is dominant and will likely remain dominant.”

Amanda Morris covers all things bioscience, which includes health care, technology, new research and the environment. Send her tips, story ideas, or dog memes at [email protected] and follow her on Twitter @amandamomorris for the latest bioscience updates.

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