Health center analysis: Almost half of COVID-19 patients are overweight

0
464
Health center analysis: Almost half of COVID-19 patients are overweight
3 Bay Area counties share information in report released by CDC

By Mike Moffitt, SFGATE

Updated.

  • FILE: EMTs move a stretcher at the Gateway Care and Rehabilitation Center on Thursday, April 9, 2020, in Hayward, Calif. Photo: Ben Margot/Associated Press / Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

    FILE: Emergency medical technicians move a stretcher at the Entrance Care and Rehab Center on Thursday, April 9, 2020, in Hayward, Calif.

    FILE: Emergency medical technicians move a stretcher at the Gateway Care and Rehab Center on Thursday, April 9, 2020, in Hayward, Calif.

    Picture: Ben Margot/Associated Press.

.

Photo: Ben Margot/Associated Press.

FILE: Emergency medical technicians move a stretcher at the Entrance Care and Rehabilitation Center on Thursday, April 9, 2020, in Hayward, Calif.

FILE: Emergency medical technicians move a stretcher at the Gateway Care and Rehab Center on Thursday, April 9, 2020, in Hayward, Calif.

Photo: Ben Margot/Associated Press.

Americans’ addiction to oily unhealthy food and heaping meal parts, disparities in access to healthy food and sitting for hours on end have actually made us particularly susceptible to COVID-19

The United States has more obese individuals– about 40 percent of the general population– than any other major country, and weight problems has actually been connected to chronic, preventable diseases such as heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. Any of those conditions can result in a more severe outcome of COVID-19

A recent analysis of hospital network data discovered that 48 percent of patients being dealt with for the disease were obese.

The COVID-NET report, released on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website, looked at 1,482 patients in 99 counties nationwide, including Alameda, Contra Costa and San Francisco counties in California. The information were gathered between March 1 and March 31.

The data showed that 9 of 10 clients had a hidden medical condition, including:

— High Blood Pressure: 49.7%

— Diabetes: 28.3%

— Chronic lung illness: 34.6%

— Heart disease: 27.8%

— Obesity: 48.3%

While the report does not verify weight problems as an independent risk aspect, when it occurs in combination with a hidden medical condition it can worsen the intensity of COVID-19

For clients aged 18 to 49, obesity was the most common underlying condition, according to the study. Nearly 60 percent of those hospitalized were overweight.

The CDC defines an overweight person as one with a body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or more, for example, a 6-foot-tall male who weighs 217 pounds. (Exception: Muscular physiques might have high BMIs without being obese or perhaps obese.)

MORE CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE:

Register For ‘The Daily’ newsletter for the latest on coronavirus here.

  • Believe you got the coronavirus last winter season? Stanford medical professionals state it’s not likely
  • Bay Location town to become one of 1st in world to check every local
  • ‘ The weirdest thing is growing this bump by yourself’: What pregnancy and birth resemble in a pandemic
  • Searching for sourdough starter in SF? Inspect the telephone pole
  • SF after dark: what will the city’s night life appear like when it’s turned back on?
  • Research study: Closing schools may not deserve the interruption
  • The increase of the ‘quarantine hairstyle’ in SF
  • Tweets reveal SF and NYC mayors’ dramatically various techniques to outbreak
  • Among SF’s earliest recording studios reacts to the pandemic
  • ‘ Business has actually been incredible’: Inside among the couple of SF companies growing throughout the pandemic
  • ‘ Last thing to go will be look after animals’: Oakland Zoo has used $1.5 M of $4.5 M reserve
  • Cellular phone data reveals which California counties are not socially distancing
  • Here’s just how much cash you’re set to receive under the $2 trillion help plan
  • Coyotes are being seen on the empty streets of San Francisco
  • Why the oldest restaurant in San Francisco refuses to lay off a single worker

Mike Moffitt is an SFGATE Digital Reporter. Email: [email protected] Twitter: @Mike_at_SFGate

Learn More

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here